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20 Tips for Negotiating Salary

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The employment conditions interview and salary negotiation often follow after a successful first job interview. This conversation is all about making concrete agreements about the different employment conditions. In addition to the salary, more matters are discussed, such as holidays, retirement or perhaps a company car. It should be clear that it will not hurt your career to start well prepared for the employment conditions interview or the salary negotiation. In this context we are happy to help you! Together with experts from practice, we looked at tips for the employment conditions interview and salary negotiations from various angles. The result? 20 tips for an employment conditions interview and salary negotiation!

Tip 1: Take the opportunity to negotiate

If your (future) employer asks whether you'll shortly "come and sign the papers", he hopes that you'll not raise the salary and the conditions. However, this upcoming discussion is extremely important. This is the opportunity to start negotiating your salary and terms of employment. So seize the opportunity and state during this meeting which reimbursement and employment conditions you would like to receive.

Tip 2: Explain the wishes clearly

It's not enough to think that everything is clear. It must also be believed that you're worth what you ask for. Never let your proposal speak for itself (a 15% higher salary, or the permission to work at home), explain exactly why it's justified. If you can't justify the question, don't ask the question.

Tip 3: Bury the hatchet: win-win it is!

The Application Doctor emphasizes that applicants often view the employment conditions interview or salary negotiation as a struggle. You fight for as much compensation as possible and your potential employer simply wants to prevent this. Realize, however, that if you enter into negotiation with this thought, you create a hostile interaction / dialogue. Instead, try to focus on discovering the wishes, needs, and preferences of the negotiating partner. The best negotiations are win-win; After all, it's important that you're both satisfied with the result at the end of the ride.

Tip 4: Know what you ask who

Companies don't negotiate; people do that. And before you can influence the person opposite you, you must understand that person. What are his / her interests and individual concerns? For example, negotiating with a potential boss is very different from negotiating with an HR representative. You may be able to afford to question an HR representative in detail about the offer. But what you don't want is to annoy someone who can become your manager with seemingly small demands.

Tip 5: Everything is negotiable

Both during the salary negotiation and employment conditions interview. From wages to lease cars, from non-competition clauses to confidentiality. An expert points to the awareness of mutual interests with regard to certain conditions. If you, as a doctor's assistant, want to negotiate the confidentiality obligation, there is a good chance that you'll ultimately not be hired.

Tip 6: Use secondary employment conditions as change in salary negotiations

The Application Doctor emphasizes that applicants often view the employment conditions interview or salary negotiation as a struggle. You fight for as much compensation as possible and your potential employer simply wants to prevent this. Realize, however, that if you enter into negotiation with this thought, you create a hostile interaction / dialogue. Instead, try to focus on discovering the wishes, needs, and preferences of the negotiating partner. The best negotiations are win-win; After all, it's important that you're both satisfied with the result at the end of the ride.

Tip 7: Focus on the intention of the person asking the question, not on the question

If, despite all the preparation, you receive a question that you didn't expect at all, remember this simple rule: It's not the question that counts, but the intention of the person asking the question. The question is often a challenge, but the intention of the questioner is benign. An employer who asks if you accept the offer immediately might be interested and wants to know if you're really enthusiastic about the job, instead of trying to push you into a corner. If you don't like the question, don't immediately assume the worst. On the contrary, answer the question in a way that you interpret the question, or ask for a clarification of the question so that you can provide a better answer.

Tip 8: Take control

Beaks advises not to wait until the employer comes up with an offer: make sure that you first mention your desired salary. With this you start the negotiations strongly. The rest of the game is based on this amount. If an employer makes a bid, it's much more difficult to raise this bid. Also make sure you bet high. This of course doesn't mean that you have to mention unrealistic amounts. Research the market and know what is going on, but don't be afraid to ask 10-20% more than your desired salary.

Tip 9: Dare to switch the subject

Van Lith Soft Skills recommends that when there is no more movement in the salary, we start with the secondary conditions. Seem to be negotiated, then try to shift the salary. By changing the subject, you remain in control during the negotiation.

Tip 10: Negotiate during employment

In general, two meetings between employer and employee take place each year: the planning interview and the performance and appraisal interview. If your employer doesn't take the initiative to schedule the planning interview, make sure that this interview takes place. The agreements that are recorded in the planning interview form the basis for the assessment interview. Investigate which net time you can spend on certain other tasks. Perhaps you work contractually 32 hours a week but you have already been scheduled for 6 hours for other tasks. The net time is then 26 hours. It's therefore possible that the target set by the employer isn't even feasible, discuss this in salary negotiations! Also agree in advance if you don't reach the target that there might be something else in return: an extra course for example.

What you need to know about the conditions

Tip 11: Don't underestimate the value of secondary employment conditions

The word secondary says it all. In negotiations these employment conditions are often in second place. Nevertheless, the secondary employment conditions are often more important than is thought. Depending on your (home) situation, the conditions can indeed offer significant financial benefits and compensate for a low salary. With family expansion, free childcare can suddenly become very interesting!

Tip 12: Prepare with a conditions list

At first glance, an offer from your potential employer may look attractive, but if you add the primary, secondary and tertiary terms of employment together, then the opposite may prove to be true. The tip of Tessa Lust from MissLegal : make a list of the primary, secondary and tertiary terms of employment before entering the negotiation meeting: 1) what is most desirable for you, 2) just acceptable, 3) just not acceptable anymore and 4) not to digest?

Tip 13: Pay attention to the minimum wage

The gross salary that an employee is going to receive must be at least a certain amount by law. Check carefully whether the amount is correct in the contract. This minimum is adjusted every year.

Tip 14: Holidays!

Employees are entitled to a number of statutory vacation days per year. This is 4 times the number of hours you work per week in hours. You must therefore be able to take 4 weeks of vacation per year legally. An employer can also give more vacation days, these are extra-statutory vacation days.

Tip 15: Travel allowance isn't an obligation

A travel allowance isn't required by law. However, there are often agreements in a collective agreement or other company regulations that an employer must then adhere to. If this isn't there, you must negotiate well during the interview.

Tip 16: Company lease car

If you get a company lease car, pay attention to the conditions that are set. Check that you're not going to pay more than, for example, that you would pay if you were driving your own car to work. If this is the case, indicate that you don't want a lease car and try to negotiate a mileage allowance for commuting. For example, make an overview of how much you spend per month on your own car (with travel allowance), and how much you spend on a lease car.

Tip 17: What about retirement?

Has anything been arranged with regard to the pension? Is there a collective pension scheme or do you receive a certain amount per month with which you can conclude a pension scheme yourself or set aside the money. The same applies to a collective health insurance policy.

Tip 18: Confidentiality?

If a confidentiality clause or a competition clause is included in your employment contract, the employer may also include a penalty clause. This must be stated clearly and in writing in the agreement or it must be stated in the collective agreement.

Tip 19: Think before you start

It's important that you carefully read the conditions or the contract before signing, in order to prevent a conflict at a later stage. Are you going to work for a fixed period, on an assignment, as a temporary worker, or do you have a contract for an indefinite period? Make sure that this is stated correctly on the contract. For each type of contract (fixed-term, indefinite, project basis), different rules apply.

Tip 20: Special secondary employment conditions

Perhaps not directly relevant for your next employment conditions interview or salary negotiation, but no less interesting: the secondary employment conditions of a few large companies. Did you know that female employees of Facebook and Apple are allowed to freeze ova at the expense of the boss? In this way, these multinationals hope to attract female talent, without the women losing sight of 'becoming a mother'. Who knows, creativity also pays during your employment conditions interview!



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